Protest and Democracy are Friends

Last week, I wrote about patriotism, and I mentioned the protests of Donald Trump’s inauguration. I questioned joining those protests.

Last week seems like a long time ago.

It’s before we choked on our coffee: “Oh god, looks like he’s actually going to build a wall. I’d hoped that was just empty election posturing.”

Obviously, the biggest news this weekend has been the travel and immigration ban affecting people from 7 predominantly muslim countries.

I’d protest this.

In fact, I teared up reading this story about Iraqi war veteran Jeffrey Buchalter going to his first-ever protest, at Dulles Airport, to show his support for the release of Iraqis hoping to come to the United States: “This is not what we fought for, having been in Iraq and working with these interpreters”.

Beyond how you may feel about Iraqi immigrants hoping to immigrate after serving with U.S. Troops, and the morality of the order, there’s also, um, legality to consider. Like whether or not this executive order is constitutional, or even legal at any level.

Apparently, it wasn’t run by officials at the Justice Department at all. Nor was Homeland Security given much guidance – cue widespread confusion and waste.

Anyway, sometimes, protest is important. Vital, even.